Ethical clothing.

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Finisterre Clothing (Source)

Yes people. It’s all very well trying to buy environmentally friendly fabrics, and not use animal products, but it all means nothing if you’re still buying into businesses that effectively use slave labour. (That was a bit more direct than I thought it would be, but there’s nothing like a little harsh truth!) As it’s Fashion Revolution week, and the anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster, I figured it might be good to share something.

Now I’m an advocate of the largely secondhand wardrobe, because not only does it contribute to good in the world, (if it comes from a charity shop you are making a donation to their work) but it means that instead of garments going on a one-way path to the garbage heap, they become part of a loop economy. Products that can be used again by someone new, avoid the fate of landfill and all the horrible dangers associated with it. When you buy secondhand you don’t require anything to be made from scratch in a factory, so no energy is wasted to create it. There’s enough already in existence to mean we shouldn’t need to buy very much completely new! It can go round and round the loop until it can’t be used any more!

However, sometimes you can’t be searching high and low for things. Also, there’s something to be said for encouraging and supporting ethical businesses with our money. So without further ado, here is a list of ethical clothes manufacturers on my radar…

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The White T-shirt Co.

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Good quality t-shirts designed to last a lifetime, they can even be tailored to your requirements.

Credentials: Organic, Fair trade, Vegan

Prices: ££

Hiut Denim

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Good quality jeans produced in a small factory (they make 100 per week!) They commit to repairing any jeans you buy from them for free for life!

Credentials: Fair trade, (Some) Organic, Repairs for life

Prices: £££

Finisterre

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Casual clothing with a focus on outdoor activity wear. Very good knitwear, jackets, base layers. Committed to eco-friendly initiatives.

Credentials: (Some) Organic, Fair trade, (Some) Recycled materials

Prices: £

Monkee Genes

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Organic jeans in a large range of styles and colours.

Credentials: Organic, Fair trade, Living wage, Vegan, (Some) Recycled materials

Prices: £

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Beaumont Organic

Beaumont Organic

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Casual/luxury clothing made from organic materials

Credentials: Organic, Fair trade

Prices: £££

Rapanui Clothing

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Organic t-shirts and hoodies

Credentials: Organic, Fair trade

Prices: £

Sea Salt Cornwall

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Casualwear, shoes and accessories

Credentials: (Some) Organic, Fair trade

Prices: ££

Swedish Stockings

Based in: Sweden

Specialises in: Sustainable hosiery made to last, using eco-friendly practices and materials. They also accept any brand of hosiery for recycling to divert them from landfill!

Credentials: Fair trade, Recycled materials, Eco-friendly practices, Zero Waste

Prices: ££

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Bibico

Bibico

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Ethical casual clothing using natural fibres

Credentials: (Some) Organic, Fair trade

Prices: ££

Green Fibres

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Organic underwear, nightwear and outerwear

Credentials: Organic, Fair trade

Prices: ££

Lowie

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Casual clothing and accessories committed to introducing organic and eco-friendly materials to their range. They offer free repairs on all purchases too!

Credentials: (Some) Organic, Fair trade, Repairs for life

Prices: £££

The Keep Boutique

Based in: UK

Specialises in: Ethical brands offering casualwear and accessories

Credentials: (Some) Organic, Fair trade

Prices: ££

5 things this Monday..

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Lake Poopó, Bolivia 2013-2016 (Source)

I realised recently that I do way too much research to even document here. Some of it deserves to be written up in an article, but some of it doesn’t really need any introduction. I’ve decided to share 5 things I’ve learned and liked with you every week, starting today!

  1. It is easy to forget why I have chosen not to buy any more items made from animal products when they are packaged and marketed to gloss over the process of how they get to the shops. This is why, as uncomfortable as it is, I watched this 15-second video by PETA showing one of the many coyotes whose fur is used to line clothes brand Canada Goose’s coats. I am no longer happy to pretend that animals do not suffer when they have to die for me. If you’re not up to watching it, the short article is here.
  2. This recipe by Green Kitchen Stories is so up my street! Greens upon greens packed into a creamy vegan sauce to accompany that lovely-looking pasta. Healthy, good-looking, and simple.
  3. Style Wise‘s article on the 6 myths about buying ethical clothing is a must-read! I used to give myself some of these excuses in order to justify my lifestyle, others I really and truly believed. If you’re wondering how ethical shopping is really done, as well as the answers to the hard and all-too-common questions, this does a pretty good job of summing it up.
  4. What was the second largest lake in Bolivia has almost completely dried up as a result of climate change, NASA found recently. The pictures speak for themselves and remind us that we cannot afford to wait a moment longer to reduce our footprints, for the sake of the world and everything living on it.
  5. I stumbled across the website Buy Me Once not too long ago and I’m so pleased. Part of the challenge of living sustainably is investing in products that last, so that the need to replace them is eliminated. This site includes a directory of clothes, items and homeware designed to last, that have repair services and lifetime warranties- an absolute dream!

Have a great day 🙂