No Spend January | Things to do.

DSC02373 (1).jpg
I’m getting so into this photography lark. So proud of this picture ๐Ÿ™‚

So, I think we can all agree I’ve now become an expert in not spending money and I’m perfect… I wish!

But I have been thinking- as much for my own sanity as for this blog post- about things you can do with no money. Even when this challenge is over, I don’t think it would hurt me financially or emotionally to spend more time doing things that don’t cost money!

So here’s a list I compiled of things I could think of. It is a bit London specific in places, because that’s where I live, but it might prompt ideas of places near you too (if you’re not London based).

  1. Visit a museum – all the museums and a great deal of galleries in London are free to enter, it’s pretty cool actually. I just finished a Christmas temp job at the Natural History Museum which was the first time I’d been to a museum in years (boo!). It reminded me how great they are, and I realised I’ve been missing out! I paid a visit to the Science Museum this week too, that’s always a fun one.
  2. Go for a walk – I know, anyone could’ve thought of this one! But you know, it’s an easily forgotten activity (at least for me). Some days I do plenty of walking from a to b, but it’s a completely different feeling walking just for the sake of it. Some of my happiest and most mindful times have been walking in the rain, kitted out in my raincoat and wellies, sometimes with an audiobook in my ears, or just listening to the sounds around me. And you don’t even have to be in nice surroundings for it to have a significant effect on your wellbeing. Trust me, I’ve been through some grotty, concrete covered places on walks! Or you could go to a park if concrete’s not your thing ๐Ÿ˜‰
  3. Take pictures – Whether it be a flower in the park, your wellies next to the door, or your friends laughing on a day out. Whipping out your phone or camera is a really nice pastime. I had no idea I would get so into it, but I now spend hours every week taking + editing my pictures for this blog, as well as for personal enjoyment. I can thank my sister for teaching me to appreciate the process- thanks Naomi!
  4. Make something – Be it sewing, drawing, colouring in, crafting is really good for getting you really immersed in what you’re doing. It’s a personal goal of mine to have at least one craft always on the go, it’s so good for my mental health. If you get creative with things you have around the house, you won’t have to spend a dime!
  5. See the sights – It’s easy to live and work in London and become desensitised to the view. It’s not all pretty, like I said, but when you pause for a second you can find beauty. I often like to walk along the Southbank next to the river Thames. There’s such a variety of magnificent buildings. You can go the 10th floor of the Tate Modern and look out over the whole city, or cross over the river to St. Paul’s Cathedral or Westminster Abbey. My favourite is standing on Waterloo or London Bridge at night, looking over the river with all the lights shining ๐Ÿ™‚
  6. Write a letter – I suppose this doesn’t count as strictly free, if you consider stamps. But paper and pens can definitely be scavenged from around the house. I wanna make more time to write letters and make my own birthday cards, I think people appreciate the effort.
  7. Declutter – If you haven’t tried it, I swear once you get into it it’s the most therapeutic, addictive thing! Taking an afternoon/day to get a room in order can make a huge difference to how you feel, plus you’ll be one step closer to a simpler, more eco-friendly life.
  8. Exercise – Go for a run! Do some press-ups! Follow a Youtube workout! Yoga! I have a very love/hate relationship with the gym, I’m about to cancel my membership for the second time in 6 months. There’s something about being in a stuffy building with other people working out that makes me hate it in the end! Then I get all guilty that I’m paying money and not using it.. I much prefer being out in the open, or at home. But whatever your thing is, do it.
  9. Journal – When you challenge yourself not to spend money, you find you’re freeing up a whole load of time. If you’ve ever wanted to start or keep up a diary, spending less money is a good way to do it! Sometimes these days, I find myself with so many thoughts and feelings in my head that I can’t not write in my diary- it’s the dream! I really want to start a bullet journal too. Just need to find the right notebook (Google it, they’re super cool!)
  10. Cook – Cooking seems to be one of the first things to suffer when we get busier. But if you’re not spending money on much else other than food, why not learn to enjoy it? Look up some new, exciting recipes on the internet, and try them out! There is nothing more satisfying than making an awesome meal from scratch (especially when you present it really nicely too).


I’m sure you guys have some much better ideas- if so, share them in the comments, I’d love to hear them ๐Ÿ™‚


No Spend January | Week 2 round up.

IMG_20180103_125257 (1)

So this week 2 has been a considerably more pleasant experience! I mean it can only go up from forgetting that you’re actually doing a no spend challenge! Anyway, I’m letting go (if I say it that makes it true, right?!)

Saying that, it was my birthday on Wednesday (23, would you believe!) Obviously that meant a few presents. I got such practical but still fun gifts, thanks family! Sewing supplies from my siblings, a couple of basic tops from White T-shirt Co. from my parents, to replace the bobbly, rubbish ones from H&M I’ve had for years ๐Ÿ™‚

Other than that, I’ve noticed myself feeling the urge to shop when feeling down. I’ll add that to the list of situations which seem to trigger my spending, like boredom, and being paid haha! Also, I think a social media + email purge is in order. Even just a few emails or Instagram adverts about January sales are enough to make me feel like I’m missing out on some mysterious bargain!

In more positive news, I’m feeling super satisfied with my wardrobe. I’ve pared it down to the perfect size and I love all my items. It’s taken me a good couple of years since I started this journey and without the temptation to buy anymore clothes, I’m getting the chance to really appreciate them! Nothing can seep into my consciousness if I can’t even see it ๐Ÿ˜‰

Just a short post this week, but I’m feeling optimistic about the remainder ofย  January ๐Ÿ™‚ Stay tuned for another post in the week!

5 Things this Monday


Happy Monday folks!

  1. The Natural History Museum in London has committed to not selling plastic bottles, YESSS! Apparently the Oval Cricket Ground is to follow suit in the next few years, and it comes several months after Wetherspoons’ no straw decision. THE TIDE IS TURNING PEOPLE!
  2. This short article from Pebble gives tips on how to buy less and make more this Christmas. If, like me, you are tired of the consumer madness and fancy some Christmassy making sessions instead then take a read!
  3. I’d love to have a go at propagating mushrooms from the ends! It’s always fun to eat things you’ve grown yourself, and this is one I’ve yet to try.
  4. This letter from a mother to her vegan daughter made me think. For probably most vegans, it is difficult to stand by and watch people put their health at risk and contribute to animal cruelty etc. but the disintegration of a relationship like this is quite sad.
  5. It makes sense when you hear it aloud: Wasting time is psychologically important. It’s not healthy or conducive to productivity to always be doing ‘useful’ things. This article is well articulated.

Navigating Christmas presents.


As I sit here googling ‘how to ask for no presents’, I stop and wonder how we got to this point. How is me having basically everything I need and not wanting (or trying not to indulge in) new things something I should be scared to tell people? I will spend the next half an hour carefully researching how best to word my request without seeming ‘ungrateful’, ‘rude’ or ‘judgey’.

I’ll be honest. The adverts and the frenzy have crept into my mindset recently, and I’m not yet strong enough to resist it completely. I have treated myself a few times and I have given my boyfriend and mum a couple of ideas of things I’d like. For me at least, it is inevitable that I will end up gaining a few possessions over this period, and I’m okay with that. At least this way (by asking for specific items) I know I’m going to use them.

The presents I’m not at all keen on are the ‘for the sake of it’ ones. And what I mean by that is the ones where the thought process has gone something along the lines of this…

I need to get them something… That’s cheap, that’ll do.


That present doesn’t look like enough on it’s own… I’ll pick up a few other little bits too.

These are the kinds of presents that I have no time for. They’re the novelty gifts, the mugs, the slipper socks, etc. I appreciate that they don’t break the bank and they make the recipient feel special because you did make some effort, but they’re also the first things that end up sitting in a drawer for years, going instantly (or eventually) to the charity shop, or if they are actually used they die an early death due to poor quality.

A few years ago I would’ve said ‘What’s the harm in these little gifts? Gifts just show you care, and it’s not the end of the world if you just donate it afterwards’. The crucial difference was that back then I didn’t think material things had value. I would cycle new clothes in and out of my wardrobe without a care because ‘it’s harmless’. I would put things in the bin and think they were ‘gone’ and ‘dealt with’. I would send something to a charity shop and go ‘I’ve done my bit’.

Since then I’ve learned that when you buy something cheap, the person who made it had to pay for it with their freedom and quality of life. When you throw something in to landfill, it causes health problems for the people that live nearby, and you contribute to the destruction of the planet and increasing natural disasters. I’m still not perfect, but I recognise that even apparently small decisions like this have an impact.

I know that getting every friend or family member a present that 1) they want 2) they’ll use 3) was made sweatshop free 4) is eco-friendly is just not possible. And that’s why I want to opt out of as many present-exchange (but mainly receiving) opportunities as I can.

HOWEVER! I also know that it’s not that easy to just say you don’t want anything. Sometimes that’s not enough. I will be posting in a few days about other alternatives, not to worry ๐Ÿ™‚




Sticking it to the man.

Hi there! I’ve been doing some thinking recently (help us all!) and it occurred to me that through this new way of life I’ve been living the last few years, I’ve been able to participate in my own acts of resistance against things I wasn’t even aware of before. Here are a few ways I’ve been sticking it to the man…

ooh, so edgy. Bare faced b+w shot

cosmetics- don’t use shampoo, and only use 3 makeup items

I am resisting the advertisement industry that lies and profits from women’s insecurity, telling us that we need an eye cream, foot cream, nail cream, and a different soap depending on whether you are male or female. My hair and skin haven’t been softer since I ditched the products which whilst doing a job, make your body reliant on them for something it can do naturally.

taken from zerowaste_munster

clothes-ย buy only a few items of clothing as needed, from ethical brands and charity shops

Spanish brand ZARA for example churns out a crazy 52 (micro) seasons a year, averaging 12000 styles (the retail average is 3000). It’s just irresponsible to think you can produce so much and encourage people to buy more and more with the situation already in dire straights. I am resisting the over over over-consumption and prices so low that people pay for your clothes with their lives on the other side of the planet.

Ribs sans animal products from 100% vegan restaurant Cafe Van Gogh

veganism- I choose not to eat animal products

I’ve had people personally offended that I don’t eat meat. I’ve even had people ask me how I can call myself Jamaican. I am aware that in some cultures meat is very embedded into the every day, but there is no reason why someone should have to condone an act they consider wrong to be a part of a culture. I’ve also been told that I am being rude or fussy when refusing food that someone of another culture has made for me because it has meat in it. I understand that for a lot of people, they don’t see or think about the process and simply see meat and animals as food. My intention is not to reject your generosity but rather to live by a principle that I think matters.

Also, something I haven’t had to experience as a woman, but that I have witnessed happen around me: the association of manliness with meat-eating. Who knows where it stems from; cavemen ideology, the preoccupation with protein and muscle-building, I can’t really comment. But as weak as the argument seems from someone liberated from the need to fit in with gender stereotypes, I have seen that in many people the need to perform their gender and what they consider to be essential components of their gender is a really strong pull.

I am resisting the association of meat-eating with culture or by being a mixed-race British person of Caribbean heritage who does not eat animal products. And as a woman I do not perpetuate the myth that to be strong, healthy, happy or fit in, it is necessary for any gender to do so either.


Yeah, so we got a little bit political today, but that’s okay! It’s important to remember that often things that are worthwhile and right, are not easy. Being aware of underlying influences in society is crucial to breaking their power and realising that they do not need to control you. Thanks for reading ๐Ÿ™‚